Posts filled under: quotes

When you grow up speaking a vernacular people are very quick to tell you that it’s incorrect, it’s wrong. But Caribbean language has its own roots, its own linguistic integrity, its own modes of speech. Part of it is that writing in vernacular helped me to understand what speech does and to see what has happened to English, having been imposed on the Caribbean people and then the Caribbean people taking it and making it their own. Hence the quote inside the front cover, which was written by my partner: “I stole the torturer’s tongue.”

Nalo Hopkinson, interviewed by Paul Jarvey of AE. She talks about her love of Theodore Sturgeon (this was at an event where local writers read from his work), how she got into the biz, what’s she’s doing next, and more. (via wildunicornherd)

And we just wrote about this, too :)

I am against religion because it teaches us to be satisfied with not understanding the world.

Richard Dawkins (via ageofreason)

See, this is why I dislike Dawkins (well, just one reason, anyhow). Here he is conflating all religions with certain kinds of fundamentalist creationist Christianity. I know a great many people who are religious (whether they are Christian, Jewish, Buddhist, Pagan, etc. etc. etc.) who are also very much interested in having a scientific understanding of the Universe. Having religious beliefs does not preclude belief in scientific principles or studies. In fact, having religious beliefs does not necessarily mean one even believes in any deities or supernatural forces. I am guessing Dawkins knows nothing about, say, Zen Buddhism? Also, not all religions (not even all forms of Christianity!) are anti-science or anti-evolution. I mean, I shouldn’t have to be saying this! But, well, there we go.

(via lindentea)

I am against Richard Dawkins because he is satisfied with not understanding religion.

(The idea that science and religion are competing enterprises and have been opposed forever and ever only really got going in the nineteenth century. North American fundamentalist evangelical Christianity as we know it was coalescing, and would end up convincing not only itself but Western culture in general that literalism is orthodox [it’s not] and that it has more in common with proto-Christianity than contemporary denominations [sweeping 2,000 years of theological development under the rug. Don’t mind those bumps there, that’s just Augustine and Aquinas and Luther and Calvin]. Even in Western Christianity, religion and science have been inextricably intertwined. Science as an actual academic profession, something that you can make money from, is very, very recent—before it was the pastime of independently wealthy white men, it was the province of clerics. I’m not even getting into how every religion has richly intellectual streams and so on because it’s not even worth my time. To quote Mean Girls, “Do you even go here?”)

(via wildunicornherd)

Well said. I might as well add that Western neuroscience is only now starting to catch up with longstanding Buddhist understandings of the human mind. I’ll leave theoretical physics out of it. Personally I’m perfectly comfortable with science and religion (which, as pointed out above, are actually intertwined) and have no problem moving between — and sometimes synthesizing — different frameworks of perception, ways of organizing knowledge, cognitive assemblage points. I’ve noticed that many literalists who think along the lines of the Dawkins quote above are unable to move fluidly in the same manner but are rigidly and arrogantly attached to a singular existential assemblage. From my perspective, that’s a mental prison.

(via zuky)

Let me just mention that there’s plenty of scientific evidence (Big Bang, evolution, invention of the microchip, etc.) in the Qur’an. Muslim scientists debate all these things A LOT, and they can manage perfectly well. And this assertion also erases the fact that ‘science’ has a long history of being used against marginalised groups like women, people of colour, and the disabled (or people at intersections of all these).

I also read his ‘critique’ of Aquinas and it’s quite clear he doesn’t understand St. Thomas at all.

Posted on March 13, 2011

Reblogged from: Mona

Source: ageofpuppy

Notes: 536 notes

Tags: my do paise,science,quotes,

Additionally, white activism, especially white anti-racism, is predicated on an economy of gratitude. We non-whites are supposed to be grateful that a white person is willing to work with non-white people. We are supposed to be grateful that you actually want to work with us and that you give us your resources. I would like to know why you have those resources and others do not? And don’t assume that just because I have to ask you for resources that it does not hurt me, pain me even. Don’t assume that when you come into the space, that doesn’t bother me. Don’t assume that when you talk first, talk the most, and talk the most often, that this doesn’t hurt me. Don’t assume that when I see you get the attention and accolades and the book deals and the speaking engagements that this does not hurt me (because you profit off of pain).

Kil Ja Kim, White Anti-Racist Is An Oxymoron: An Open Letter to “White Anti-Racists”.

Fascinating read.

(via thesadnessofpencils)

Not a lot of irony is more bitter than the racism of anti-racism.

Know what I do (and my brother does too and I’m outing him)? Sometimes, if a situation is gonna be pretty delicate and the white people around who want to be involved, at least in showy ways, are people whose actions I don’t fully trust to not be problematic, disrespectful and destructive? Sometimes I don’t invite white people to the stuff I’m working on. I’ll tell them about it later and they can tell me all about how it’s not radical enough for them or whatever other things they read in a Crimethinc/Derrick Jensen book—but I’m not gonna leave the chance for them to derail my work with that shit til after I’m done. Wait, that’s exclusive?

Oh.

(via readnfight)

sounds like a load of petty infighting and generalizations when what we need is solidarity. with so much going on how can one even rationalize taking the time to register the color of ones skin?

(via sisyphusandtheskilift)

One moment, I’m going to call up everyone so we can sing Kumbaya all nice and loud while you people ignore that Certain People exploit our pain, appropriate our anger, and then run us over several times while claiming to be helping us.

(via thesadnessofpencils)

It may be of interest to remark that this notion of Kumbaya as representing wishy-washy liberal activism appropriates the African diasporic origins of the song, as well.

(via mercredigirl)

I can’t really parse this at the moment because language/context is tough to get through when spoonless, but I will deconstruct this and get back to you. Thanks.

I don’t believe in charity. I believe in solidarity. Charity is so vertical. It goes from the top to the bottom. Solidarity is horizontal. It respects the other person. I have a lot to learn from other people.

-Eduardo Galeano (via erespielmorena)

YES YES

(via mikkipedia)

Solidarity is also horizontal. It assumes that you may have kinship with someone who is contributing to your oppression and should know better (WHITESTREAM FEMINISM I AM LOOKING AT YOU) when you may be triggered by it or really, want nothing to do with them personally.

That article going a while back talked about this in greater detail. I can’t seem to find the link right now.

Posted on March 9, 2011

Reblogged from: Creatrix Tiara

Source: erespielmorena

Notes: 336 notes

Tags: quotes,

Additionally, white activism, especially white anti-racism, is predicated on an economy of gratitude. We non-whites are supposed to be grateful that a white person is willing to work with non-white people. We are supposed to be grateful that you actually want to work with us and that you give us your resources. I would like to know why you have those resources and others do not? And don’t assume that just because I have to ask you for resources that it does not hurt me, pain me even. Don’t assume that when you come into the space, that doesn’t bother me. Don’t assume that when you talk first, talk the most, and talk the most often, that this doesn’t hurt me. Don’t assume that when I see you get the attention and accolades and the book deals and the speaking engagements that this does not hurt me (because you profit off of pain).

Kil Ja Kim, White Anti-Racist Is An Oxymoron: An Open Letter to “White Anti-Racists”.

Fascinating read.

(via thesadnessofpencils)

Not a lot of irony is more bitter than the racism of anti-racism.

Know what I do (and my brother does too and I’m outing him)? Sometimes, if a situation is gonna be pretty delicate and the white people around who want to be involved, at least in showy ways, are people whose actions I don’t fully trust to not be problematic, disrespectful and destructive? Sometimes I don’t invite white people to the stuff I’m working on. I’ll tell them about it later and they can tell me all about how it’s not radical enough for them or whatever other things they read in a Crimethinc/Derrick Jensen book—but I’m not gonna leave the chance for them to derail my work with that shit til after I’m done. Wait, that’s exclusive?

Oh.

(via readnfight)

sounds like a load of petty infighting and generalizations when what we need is solidarity. with so much going on how can one even rationalize taking the time to register the color of ones skin?

(via sisyphusandtheskilift)

One moment, I’m going to call up everyone so we can sing Kumbaya all nice and loud while you people ignore that Certain People exploit our pain, appropriate our anger, and then run us over several times while claiming to be helping us.

Second, the idea that any one of us can represent the many is inherently flawed. It doesn’t matter who we’re talking about – no one can fully represent the whole of who we are and our varied thoughts and feelings. The trouble is that our current system requires exactly that – certain groups, in order to access a seat at the table, a representative will be assigned. Some folks would call that an attempt at diversity – but it is a nefarious double bind for those of us who get the nod. To refuse to participate may mean that voice is never represented, that the voices are the underrepresented are once again unvoiced, unheard, and perhaps unknown. Unfortunately, absence can be interpreted as a reinforcement of the status quo – if women of color are not present, then the uniformed interpret this to mean we have nothing to say. Or, even worse, it is a reinforcement that critical feminist theorists of color do not exist.

However, to accept the position also means to be pressed into the token spot. To often be the only person versed in issues pertinent to women of color. To have to change what you want to say or do or talk or think about because someone else on the panel just said something so egregious (and something quietly accepted as truth) that you know have to challenge their fucked up worldview.

On Being Feminism’s “Ms. Nigga” | Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture

As long as we’re talking about feminism: this is a great piece on feminism and tokenism.

(via badparsiqueer)

I despise the prevailing norm that stratifies knowledge so much. That forces us into Ivory Tower-ish positions, yet we know that if we do not, we will be thrown under the bus with even greater force.

your ideal graduate student is
someone who doesn’t have to experience community organizing
because you’ve already assigned them five chapters to read about it

your ideal graduate student is
someone who can’t talk about positionality or privilege
without referencing some article

your ideal graduate student is
rich enough
white enough
straight enough
able-bodied and -minded enough
to be given luxury of enjoying sitting in a corner reading 900 pages a week
(with their fair trade starbucks coffee in hand and their lulu lemon track pants on ass)

your ideal graduate student
IS NOT ME

so WHY did you let me through these doors in the first place
if you were just gonna turn around and shove me out?

to fill some quote for affirmative action?
to appear like a progressive program without putting in the effort of actually being one?

Shaunga Tagore, “A Slam on Feminism in Academia”, Feminism For Real: Deconstructing the Academic Industrial Complex of Feminism (edited by Jessica Yee)

We should probably start a support group for marginalised peeps stuck in whitestream academia. I have friends who study IR and they are not amused.

Posted on March 8, 2011

Reblogged from: Merf. Thinking is Hard.

Source: zuky

Notes: 273 notes

Tags: quotes,

I once read, scribbled on a bathroom wall, ‘Gender is a universe and we are all stars.’ I am still trying to pinpoint my constellation.

— (via acciolesbians)

Posted on March 7, 2011

Reblogged from: you're welcome.

Notes: 184 notes

Tags: quotes,

I used to like Lion King. But then, a few months ago, I walked past some builders and they yelled, ‘HAKUNA MATATA!!’ at me. I gave them the finger, and now I can’t stand that movie.

— Black, female-presented classmate of mine.
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